Our Team

Rachel-Blustain

Rachel Blustain, LMSW

Before becoming a therapist, I worked as an editor for a publication called Rise. My job there was to help parents who had endured the trauma of having their children removed from their custody tell their stories and advocate for more effective and just policies. That work taught me about trauma from people who had lived through it. It showed me that people can grow from tragedy, create community and begin to heal intergenerational wounds. It deepened my appreciation for the value of all families, whatever their struggles. I also learned about the many ways that personal suffering and social injustice are connected, and how coming to understand that relationship can help people overcome shame and find their voice in the world. I have an eye for noticing core themes in the narratives people tell about their lives and a desire to be with people wherever they are, qualities I employed as an editor and which I bring to my role as a therapist as well.

I earned my master’s degree in clinical social work from Hunter College School of Social Work in 2010 and a bachelors of arts in English literature from Brown University in 1993. I have training in many modalities, including mindfulness and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, parts work, attachment theory, the neuroscience of anxiety, and grief counseling, among others. I regularly incorporate psychoeducation about trauma, attachment, shame, and anxiety into my work.

I strive to make therapy a creative and collaborative process that helps clients gain courage, flexibility, and resilience. I have an informal and at times light-hearted style, while also being deeply attentive and responsive to clients’ changing needs.

As we work together, I help clients connect the mind and body and notice how their feelings express themselves internally. Over time, this noticing and naming increase self-compassion as well as the ability to regulate and respond effectively to one’s emotions. Alongside a focus on the body, clients gain greater awareness of core themes in their narratives and better understand their unique strengths and vulnerabilities. Lastly, I work with clients to recognize what brings them satisfaction, meaning and joy. By deepening clients’ understanding of their values and life philosophies, we make space for different ways of thinking, feeling, and acting in the world. 

 I continue to write and work in the field of parent advocacy. In my free time, I read, write, play tennis, enjoy Prospect Park and goof around with my family.